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THE
AUSTRALIAN
NATIONAL
UNIVERSITY

the Chameleon

edition #1
September, 2001


In this edition:

The following is a list of current Members & Affiliates of the CRLC, in alphabetical order of family name. Click on the links to see more detail, or e-mail

Dr. Cynthia Allen, FAHA, (profile) School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Cindy.Allen@anu.edu.au
(foundation member)
Dr. Barry Alpher, Washington DC
e-mail: alpher@attglobal.net
(associate member)
Mr. Evershed Amuzu, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail:
evershed.amuzu@anu.edu.au (full member)
Dr. Avery Andrews, (profile) School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail:Avery.Andrews@anu.edu.au
(foundation member)
Dr. Wayan Arka, (profile) Department of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail:
wayan.arka@anu.edu.au (full member)
Professor Peter Bellwood, (profile) FAHA, Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Peter.Bellwood@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. John Bowden, (profile) Department of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail: john.bowden@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Ms. Claire Bowern, PhD student, Department of Linguistics, Harvard University; Short-term Visiting Fellow School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: bowern@fas.harvard.edu (full member)
Associate Professor, Terry Crowley, Department of General and Applied Linguistics, University of Waikato, New Zealand
e-mail: tcrowley@waikato.ac.nz (associate member)
Dr. Tony Diller, (profile) FAHA, National Thai Studies Centre, Faculty of Asian Studies
e-mail: Anthony.Diller@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Professor Jerold Edmondson, (profile) Program in Linguistics, University of Texas, Arlington
e-mail: edmondson@uta.edu
(associate member)
Dr. Jennifer Hendriks, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: jennifer.hendriks@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. Peter Hendriks, Japan Centre, Faculty of Asian Studies
e-mail: peter.hendriks@anu.edu.au
(foundation member)
Dr. Luise Hercus, (profile) FAHA, Visiting Fellow, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Luise.Hercus@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Ms. Pascale Jacq, (profile) Visiting Fellow, Southeast Asia Centre, Faculty of Asian Studies
e-mail: pascale.jacq@anu.edu.au
(full member)
Professor Rhys Jones, FAHA, FSA, Department of Archaeology and Natural History, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
(foundation member)
Dr. Ritsuko Kikusawa, (profile) Department of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail: ritsuko@coombs.anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. Harold Koch, (profile) School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Harold.Koch@anu.edu.au
(foundation member)
Emeritus Professor Hans Kuhn, Visiting Fellow, School of Language Studies, Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Hans.Kuhn@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. Ann Kumar, (profile) FAHA, Centre for Asian Societies and Histories, Faculty of Asian Studies
e-mail: Ann.Kumar@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Professor Emerita. Isabel McBryde, Visiting Fellow, History Department, Faculty of Arts and Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
(foundation member)
Dr. Patrick McConvell, Visiting Fellow, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: patrick@aiatsis.gov.au (foundation member)
Ms. Luisa Miceli, Visiting Fellow, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts; PhD Student, Department of Linguistics, University of Western Australia
e-mail: lmiceli@cyllene.uwa.edu.au (fullmember)
Mr. Stephen Morey, PhD Student,Monash University
e-mail: stephen.morey@arts.monash.edu.au (associate member)
Dr. David Nash, Visiting Fellow, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: david.nash@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Professor Andrew Pawley, (profile) FAHA, Department of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail: Andrew.Pawley@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. Nick Riemer, Centre for Cross-Cultural Research
e-mail: nick.riemer@anu.edu.au (fullmember)
Dr. Phil Rose, (profile) School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Philip.Rose@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. Malcolm Ross, (profile) FAHA, Department of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail: Malcolm.Ross@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. Alan Rumsey, (profile) Department of Anthropology, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail: Alan.Rumsey@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr. Paul Sidwell, (profile) Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail: paul.sidwell@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Mr. Ross Slater, PhD Student, School of Language Studies, ANU
e-mail: Ross.Slater@student.anu.edu.au (full member)
Professor Matthew Spriggs, (profile) FAHA, School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Matthew.Spriggs@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Professor Mireille Tremblay, Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Linguistics Program, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada
e-mail: mt11@qsilver.queensu.ca (associate member)
Dr. Darrell Tryon, (profile) Department of Linguistics, Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies
e-mail: darrell.tryon@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Dr Kevin Windle, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts
e-mail: Kevin.Windle@anu.edu.au (foundation member)
Committee
Director:
Dr. Malcolm Ross (FAHA, Department of Linguistics, RSPAS)
Associate Directors:
Dr. Cynthia Allen (FAHA, School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts)
Dr. Tony Diller (FAHA, National Thai Studies Centre, Faculty of Asian Studies)
Representatives:
Dr. John Bowden (Department. of Linguistics, RSPAS)
Dr. Ann Kumar (FAHA, Centre for Asian Societies and Histories, Faculty of Asian Studies)
Dr. Harold Koch (School of Language Studies (Program in Linguistics), Faculty of Arts)
Administrator:
Ms. Pascale Jacq (Visiting Fellow, Southeast Asia Centre, Faculty of Asian Studies)

FAQs

What is the CRLC?

The CRLC promotes, coordinates and sponsors research on all aspects of language change and on the history of particular languages and language families.

The Centre is a focus for all research in this field at the Australian National University (ANU), combining interests previously divided amongst the Department of Linguistics in the Research School of Pacific and Asian Studies (RSPAS), the School of Language Studies in the Faculty of Arts, various centres in the Faculty of Asian Studies, and members of the Departments of Anthropology and of Archaeology and Natural History, RSPAS, and the School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Faculty of Arts.

We seek to actively promote the formulation of cross-campus and inter-university projects and seek appropriate funding for them, support directly selected projects or aspects of them, organise seminars, lectures and conferences, publish appropriate works and publicise the interests and achievements of historical linguistics at the ANU. The CRLC is unique in the world. There is no other centre devoted exclusively to research on language change across language families. ANU scholars connected with the Centre will play a role in defining the discipline on a world scale.

Why a chameleon?

Pascale Jacq

I created the chameleon mascot for the CRLC to symbolise change. Also chameleons symbolise the 'exotic' language families we are involved in with our research (Chamaeleontidae lizards are found in Africa and Madagascar). Harold Koch suggested I make him pop his tongue out to show a dynamic representation of change, and also because the word 'language' in English is derived historically from the Latin root (lingua) meaning 'tongue'. The different colours are used on the CRLC's web page to distinguish the different pages and the CRLC's areas of interest, e.g. events, education, research, members, etc. Some may argue that theoretically we shouldn't be able to see our chameleon at any time on the web page because of the chameleon's remarkable camouflaging ability, but where's the fun in that?

What is the logo?

Pascale Jacq

When asked by the committee to come up with a logo for the CRLC, I was a little stumped. How do you represent 'change' with an unmoving image? Playing around with shapes, Paul Sidwell noticed how one my triangles looked like the Greek 'delta' symbol (uppercase). Knowing more logic than I did, he remarked how the symbol is used in logic to symbolise change. I slanted it a little to the right to emphasise the CRLC's aims in the future and our aim to make advances in the field of historical linguistics.


The launch of the CRLC

Pascale Jacq

The Centre for Research on Language Change was officially inaugurated by the Vice-Chancellor Professor Ian Chubb on the 20th August, 2001. Over 50 people attended the launch which was held at the Manning Clark Centre, ANU. The Director, Dr. Malcolm Ross first described how the Centre came to be, and its objectives. Dr. Harold Koch introduced the guest speaker Professor Alice Harris (Vanderbilt University) who presented a Public lecture: 'Words within Words' —describing how Udi (Caucasian language) verbs appear to be 'split' by person/number marking clitics, although an historical account of the Udi verbs suggests that these words were derived from two morphemes (and thus the clitics behave quite 'normally'). Cynthia Allen thanked the speakers. This was followed by an opulent reception with drinks and nibbles. The night was a great success and we even had the weather on our side (downpours once all guests had arrived, which miraculously stopped just in time before going home!). Thank you to all who helped organise the 'gala' event and especially Ingrid Ross who prepared the exotic feast and Meredith Osmond who also helped on the night.


Feature [back to top]

Why “language change”?

Harold Koch

Readers may wonder why we have included in the name of our Centre the term “language change” rather than “historical linguistics”. Several considerations have informed our decision.
In the first place, “language change” seems more user-friendly and informative to those who are not specialists in linguistics. It states openly and directly what our subject matter is without hiding behind disciplinary labels. It further avoids possible confusion with the history of linguistics or the literary history of languages.
Secondly, it allows the subject matter to be understood more broadly. It admits interdisciplinary approaches to language change, such as exploring the cultural correlates of language spread, shift, and contact—using evidence from archaeology, anthropology, and history. It admits approaches to language change which come from “hyphenated linguistic” disciplines, such as sociolinguistic network theory, or the psycho-social study of attitudes toward language.
We do as well include in our understanding of langauge change the traditional aspects of describing, reconstructing, and explaining diachronic alterations to the phonological, morphological, syntactic, semantic, and lexical systems of particular languages and families of languages; modeling the historical relations between languages; and contributing to the general theory of linguistic change.

People [back to top]

Profile: Paul Sidwell awarded a ARC Postdoctoral Fellowship with RSPAS

Paul Sidwell

It is a great privilege for me to be able to pursue my research project at the ANU as a Postdoctoral Fellow and member of the Centre for Research on Language Change.

In January of 2000 I submitted an application for an Australian Research Council (ARC) Australian Postdoctoral Research Fellowship (APD) for a project entitled “Linguistic prehistory in Southeast Asia: 2000 years of contact between Austroasiatic and Austronesian Speakers”. In tha tI proposed using the techniques of comparative linguistic reconstruction to shed some light on the undocumented history of the establishment of the Chamic and Khmer kingdoms in Southeast Asia and the histories of the Austroasiatic hill tribes that inhabit the Annamite Mountains and who have been in ongoing and intimate contact with the Khmers and Chams for at least 2000 years.

As it turned out, I was not offered an APD in the first round, and instead took up a clerical position with the Department of Immigration in Canberra. Luckily, and to my great relief, I didn’t languish too long in the Public Service as Professor Bernard Comrie of the Max Planck Institute (Leipzig) offered me a one year research position. I took this up in April 2001, basing myself at ANU. For the next 3 months I concentrated on revising the genetic classification of the Bahnaric language family, and completed a paper on the topic for Mon-Khmer Studies.
While enjoying the Max Planck position I finally received an offer from the ARC, and eventually moved into the Department of Linguistics in the RSPAS in July 2001. I am now hard at work comprehensively revising the reconstruction of Proto Bahnaric and Proto Katuic, a task that will take at least a year.
paul in Ban Sapuan
Paul (on right) at Ban Sapuan, Lao PDR, 1999.

In addition to my historical linguistic research, I have been collaborating for several years with Pascale Jacq in fieldwork on and description of West Bahnaric languages of Southern Laos. In November 2001 Pascale and I will return to Laos to continue this work, concentrating on the endangered Nhaheun language, and surveying the Boloven Plateau region for other minority languages.


Professor Rhys Jones

We are sad to announce that our Foundation Member Professor Rhys Jones passed away on the 26th September, after a lengthy illness.


Education [back to top]

During the second semester, 2001 a course “Study of a Language Family” is being offered, featuring the Tai-Kadai family. The course is convened by CRLC member Tony Diller, with substantial participation by our affiliate Professor Jerold Edmondson of the University of Texas at Arlington, who was a Visiting Fellow at ANU July-September.



Events [back to top]

ICHL: 15th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, August 2001

Harold Koch

CRLC linguists were well represented at the 15th International Conference on Historical Linguistics, Melbourne 12-18 August. Cynthia Allen gave a plenary address “Typology, deflexion and the development of the genitive in English”. Claire Bowern (Harvard University and Visiting Fellow, ANU) and Harold Koch organised a Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages, which included 14 papers plus a panel discussion.
The following papers were given by CRLC members:
  • Alpher, Barry: Arguments for Pama-Nyungan as a genetic subgroup [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • Austin, Peter (with Ilia Peiros): Lexical reconstruction within Australia
  • Bowern, Claire: Diagnostic similarities and differences between Nyulnyulan and neighbouring languages [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • Bowern, Claire: Subordination in Nyulnyulan languages
  • Tremblay, Mireille: Particles and prepositions in the history of French
  • Diller, Anthony: Evidence for Austro-Asiatic strata in Tai
  • Hercus, Luise (and Jane Simpson): Thura-Yura as a subgroup [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • Hercus, Luise (and Peter Austin): The classification of Malyangapa [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • Kikusawa, Ritsuko: Observations on the Ergative to Accusative drift in Austronesian languages
  • Koch, Harold: Morphological reconstruction as an etymological method
  • Koch, Harold: The Arandic subgroup [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • Koch, Harold (moderator): Panel discussion: Pama-Nyungan as a genetic construct [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • McConvell, Patrick: Pama-Nyungan and issues in prehistory [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • McConvell, Patrick (and Mary Laughren): The Ngumpin-Yapa subgroup [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • McConvell, Patrick (and Mike Smith): A miller's tale: Linguistic and archaeological stratigraphy of seed-grinding in Australia [in Workshop on Linguistic Stratigraphy and Prehistory]
  • Miceli, Luisa (panelist): Methodological approaches to Pama-Nyungan [in Workshop on Reconstruction and Subgrouping in Australian Languages]
  • Riemer, Nick: Meaning change in verbs: the case of strike
  • Ross, Malcolm: The diachronic fate of constructions: expressing location in Pacific languages

HistLing Seminars, Series 1: June-August, 2001 [back to top]

Harold Koch (HistLing organiser)

The ANU Historical Linguistics Seminars 2001 series was held during the months June-August, as follows (click on links to view abstract):

Date Speaker Topic
6 June

Paul Sidwell
(Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Linguistics, RSPAS)

“How to determine the genetic classification of morphologically impoverished languages: Lexicostatistics, ‘distinctive vocabulary’, or phonological reconstruction?” [Abstract]
13 June

Ritsuko Kikusawa
(Visiting Fellow, Linguistics, RSPAS)

“Determining the cognacy of two ‘similar’ grammatical forms: A case study” [Abstract]
27 June

Harold Koch
(Linguistics, Arts)

“Morphological reconstruction as an etymological method: lessons from reconstructing Proto-Arandic” [Abstract]
4 July

Patrick McConvell (AIATSIS & Visiting Fellow, Linguistics, Arts)

Mike Smith (National Museum of Australia)

A Miller’s tale: the archaeo-linguistic stratigraphy of seed-grinding in Australia” [Abstract]
11 July

Claire Bowern
(PhD student, Harvard University & Visiting Fellow, Linguistics, Arts)

“Nyulnyulan pronouns and pronoun-like things” [Abstract]
18 July

Evershed Amuzu
(PhD student, Linguistics, Arts)

“Lexical structure in English-Ewe code-switching”[Abstract]
25 July

Laura Daniliuc
(PhD student, Linguistics, Arts)

“History of the compound perfect tense in the Romance languages” [Abstract]
1 Aug.

Anna Wierzbicka
(Linguistics, Arts)

“Right and wrong: a study in historical semantics and historical pragmatics” [Abstract]
8 Aug.

Jerold Edmondson
(University of Texas, Arlington; Visiting Fellow Faculty of Asian Studies, ANU)

“Borrowing, Shift, and Convergence: Some cases of Asian Tone in Contacts” [Abstract]
12-18 Aug. 15th International Conference on Historical Linguistics (ICHL), Melbourne
22 Aug.

Brian Joseph
(Ohio State University; Visiting Fellow Research Centre for Linguistic Typology, La Trobe University)

“The role of analogy in language change” [Abstract]
29 Aug.

Nick Riemer
(Centre for Cross-Cultural Research)

“Meaning changes in verbs: The case of strike” [Abstract]

 


Upcoming Conferences [back to top]

September 27th-30th, 2001
Australian Linguistic Society

The annual conference of the Australian Linguistic Society is to be held at the ANU from Thursday 27 - Sunday 30 September 2001. Seventy papers are to be presented over three days on a broad range of topics including but not limited to Australian languages, with Sunday reserved for a workshop on tracking language use, proficiency and program outcomes in indigenous languages.

Registration fees are $40 for students, $60 for non-students. The registration form can be downloaded from the conference webpage: http://rspas.anu.edu.au/linguistics/ALS2001, where you can also view abstracts of papers to be presented and details of the program.

Enquiries can be directed to Meredith Osmond on (2) 6125 3270.

January 8th-11th, 2002
The 9th International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics (9ICAL)

The 9th International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics (9ICAL) will be held in Canberra, at Burgmann College, The Australian National University, from January 8-11, 2002. The papers to be presented at 9ICAL are on a broad range of topics concerning Austronesian languages. Keynote speakers are Frank Lichtenberk (Auckland, New Zealand) “The possessive-benefactive connection” and Dr. Bambang Kaswanti Purwo “Bitransitive Verbs in some Austronesian Languages

Workshops:
•Dr.Miriam van Staden and Professor Gunter Senft “Multiverb and Serial Verb Constructions in Austronesian Languages”
•Dr.Anna Margetts and Dr. Jae Jung Song “Benefactives in Oceanic Languages”
•Dr. Cecilia Odé “Basics for the experimental phonetic study of intonation in the field.With examples from AN (Indonesian, Local Bird’s Head Malay (West Papua) and NAN (Mpur, tone language, Northeastern Bird’s Head) languages.”

Registration fees for 9ICAL only A$100 for students, A$170 for non-students. If you wish to attend both 9ICAL and COOL5 conferences the fees are: A$120 for students, and A$200 for non-students.

More information on both conferences is available on-line at http://rspas.anu.edu.au/linguistics/ANConfs, or please e-mail: Anconf@anu.edu.au. Note that payment is not required at this stage.

January 14th-16th, 2002
The 5th International Conference on Oceanic Languages (COOL5)

The 5th International Conference of Oceanic Languages (COOL5) will be held from 14-16 January at Burgmann College, The Australian National University with papers specifically addressing Oceanic languages, and keynote address by Dr. Jean-Claude Rivierre and Dr. Françoise Ozanne-Rivierre “Verbal compounds and ‘classifying’ verbal prefixes in the languages of New-Caledonia”.

Registration fees for COOL5 only A$60 for Students, A$ 100 for non-Students. If you wish to attend both 9ICAL and COOL5 conferences the fees are: A$120 for students, and A$200 for non-students.

More information on both conferences is availiable on-line at http://rspas.anu.edu.au/linguistics/ANConfs, or please e-mail: Anconf@anu.edu.au. Note that payment is not required at this stage.

October 1-4, 2002
ARCLING II, 2002

The Second Conference on the Archaeology and Linguistics of Australia to be held at the National Museum of Australia And Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Canberra.

The last decade has advanced our knowledge of Australian indigenous languages and the archaeological record, and has also seen an upsurge in hypotheses and controversies in prehistory, including linguistic prehistory. The time is ripe to assess the discoveries and theories, and to provide a forum for cross-fertilisation between Australian and world prehistory; and between the different disciplines which contribute to our overall understanding of prehistory. ARCLING II has been planned for 2002 to bring together archaeologists, linguists and others to record progress made and map out the challenges we now face.

Registration will be A$220 if paid before March 1 2002 and A$275 after that date.

If you wish to give a paper, please send a title and abstract to Patrick McConvell by November 5 2001. This should be a Word or RTF attachment to an email message of between 200 and 500 words.

Contact: Dr. Patrick McConvell, Convener, Planning Committee Phone: 02-62461116; E-mail: patrick@aiatsis.gov.au


Current Research Projects & Investigators [back to top]

Australian Aboriginal

Australian historical linguistics—An emphasis on the reconstruction of the history of the languages in Central Australia. Various Investigators: Dr. Harold Koch (School of Language Studies, ANU), Dr. Patrick McConvell (School of Language Studies, ANU), Dr. David Nash (School of Language Studies, ANU), Dr. Luise Hercus (School of Language Studies, ANU), Ms. Claire Bowern (Harvard University), Ms. Luisa Miceli (School of Language Studies, ANU; Department of Linguistics, University of Western Australia)

Austronesian

Change in Austronesian languages in Melanesia in the historical period This project looks at languages with a written tradition, thus mainly mission languages. Investigators: Dr.Darrell Tryon (RSPAS), Professor Peter Mühlhäusler (University of Adelaide), Dr. Jean-Claude Rivierre (LACITO-CNRS, Paris) [back to top]

The Proto Oceanic lexicon project—Reconstructing the lexicon of the language ancestral to the Austronesian languages of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia, with emphasis on terminologies associated with particular fields. The Proto Oceanic language was almost certainly associated with the rapid colonisation of Island Melanesia and the central Pacific by bearers of the Lapita culture between about 1500 and 1000BC. Investigators: Professor Andrew Pawley (RSPAS, ANU); Dr. Malcolm Ross (RSPAS, ANU)

The morphosyntax of Proto Oceanic—Reconstructing the basic sentence structures of the language ancestral to the Austronesian languages spoken in Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia, with emphasis on the reconstruction of the case-marking system and plotting the diachronic changes that have led to the case-marking systems of contemporary Oceanic languages. Investigators: Dr. Ritsuko Kikusawa (RSPAS, ANU), Dr. Malcolm Ross (RSPAS, ANU), Professor Andrew Pawley (RSPAS, ANU) & Dr. Isabell Bril (LACITO-CNRS, Paris), Dr. Lawrence Reid (University of Hawai'i) [back to top]

On the development of (a)symmetrical systems in AN languages and its implications on voice markings and voice alternations—This project on historical linguistics includes gathering evidence (and implications) for the development that leads to current mixed grammatical alignments in AN languages, particularly addressing the issues of symmetrical vs non-symmetrical properties. Investigator: Dr. Wayan Arka (RSPAS, ANU)

Germanic

Diachronic English Syntax—Dr. Cynthia Allen has long been researching aspects of the history of English grammar from the Middle Ages, based on a first-hand examination of the texts. Her most recent work has focussed primarily on the relationship between morphological and syntactic change. Allen (1995) is an investigation of how changes to the case marking system of English relate dto changes in grammatical relations, while Allen (1997) explores how possessive noun phrases, which now use a clitic which is derived from an old genetive case marker, fit in with the general loss of case. Investigator: Dr. Cynthia Allen (School of Language Studies, ANU)

Contact-induced language change in Western Europe of the 16th and 17th centuries: the impact of immigrants in the history of the Dutch language—Due to the deeply entrenched (though erroneous) belief in the particular importance of elite social groups in the process of linguistic change, the linguistic histories and handbooks of Dutch have considered relevant only one brief wave of 'prestigious' migration from the southern Netherlands—that is, what is now Flanders in Belgium. The far larger number of immigrants from the east (modern-day Germany) has been ignored, due to the belief that they were of low social standing and therefore of little or no linguistic importance. However examination of letters and diaries written by these immigrants is showing that they were of great importance linguistically. This project, not only aims at re-writing the linguistic histories of Dutch, but also concerns itself with investigating what sort of social relations play a role in language change. Investigator: Dr. Jennifer Hendriks (School of Language Studies, ANU)

Japanese

The history of the syntax of certain central and peripheral Japanese dialects—in particular, investigating the loss/retention of a syntactic phenomenon known as kakari-musubi, and its concomitant verbal inflections. A second project investigates the claims of the influence of Western languages on the syntax of the Japanese language. Investigator: Dr. Peter Hendriks (Faculty of Asian Studies, ANU) [back to top]

Early linguistic contact between Indonesia (Java) and Japan—an investigation into the possibility of hitherto unrecognised but substantial Indonesian influence on early Japanese civilisation. Supporting evidence is gathered from rice genetics, bio-anthropology especially mitochondrial DNA, as well as suggestive archeological material. A corpus of loanwords including items referring to rice cultivation, metallurgy, weaving of cloth, development of communal storehouses, and the introduction of new rituals and beliefs not only corroborates this evidence but also reveals the nature of the influence. Investigators: Dr. Ann Kumar (Faculty of Asian Studies, ANU) and Dr. Phil Rose (School of Language Studies, ANU)

Mon-Khmer (Austroasiatic)

Linguistic prehistory in Southeast Asia: 2000 years of contact between Austroasiatic and Austronesian speakers—funded by the Australian Research Council, the project focuses on two Austroasiatic language groups, Bahnaric and Katuic, and one Austronesian, Chamic, which are located mainly in Vietnam and neighbouring countries. These languages have been in continuous contact for around 2000 years. The aim is to intensively investigate the history of language contact and change, leading to improved understanding of the general processes involved, and the histories of the particular languages and peoples. Investigator: Dr. Paul Sidwell (RSPAS, ANU)

The Katuic-Bahnaric Nexus—funded by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, the project revises and integrates the reconstruction of Proto-Katuic and Proto-Bahnaric, to yield a model of a) how they diverged from a common ancestor in pre-history, and b) how they then continued to influence each other through ongoing intimate contact up to the present day. Investigator: Dr. Paul Sidwell (RSPAS, ANU) [back to top]

Reconstruction of the morphological system of Proto West Bahnaric: infixes and prefixes—The once rich morphological system of Proto Mon-Khmer has survived to some extent in Proto West Bahnaric. However the Proto West Bahnaric prefixing and infixing system is only reconstructible when we make a comprehensive comparison (including phonological reconstruction) of the languages. This is because not one of the daughter languages spoken today (including Jruq (Loven), Nhaheun, Oi, Laveh, Cheng, Sapuar) has any productive morphology, and various phonological and word structure changes have masked important distinctions such as prefix voicing. Investigator: Ms. Pascale Jacq (Faculty of Asian Studies, ANU)

Papuan

Comparative Papuan linguistics—reconstruction of the prehistory of the Trans New Guinea phylum, the large group of languages spanning much of mainland New Guinea and reaching west to Timor and Alor. Investigators: Professor Andrew Pawley (RSPAS, ANU), Dr. Malcolm Ross (RSPAS, ANU), Professor William Foley (University of Sydney) [back to top]

Pidgins & Creoles

Pidgin and Creole languages of Australia and the Pacific—the principal aim of this program is to demonstrate and define the formative steps in the development of modern Pacific pidgins and creoles, particularly Bislama (Vanuatu), Pijin (Solomon Islands) and Tok Pisin (Papua New Guinea) and their relationship to Australian pidgins such as Kriol (Northern Territory) and Broken (Torres Strait). Various Investigators: Dr. Darrell Tryon (RSPAS, ANU), Dr Jean-Michel Charpentier (CNRS, Paris), Professor Peter Mühlhäusler (University of Adelaide), Assoc. Prof. Terry Crowley (University of Waikato, New Zealand)

Sino-Tibetan

Historical development of tone and tone sandhi in the Wu Dialects of Chinese—Drs Rose and Zhu are currently exhaustively describing the sandhi synchronically over most of the Wu area. The project within the CRLC addresses its diachronic aspects, and will determine how the sandhi arose and diversified. In addition, material on the segmentals has been collected and analysed, which will allow a complete reconstruction of Wu historical phonology. Investigators: Dr. Phil Rose (School of Languages, ANU), Dr. Zhu Xiaonong (Linguistics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology) [back to top]

Tai-Kadai

Tai historical linguistics—Tracing language change in Thai, Lao and related languages in the Tai-Kadai family, along with consideration of possible linkages with other families in the area. Changes investigated have ranged from phonetics & phonology through syntax/semantics/pragmatics. Some important Thai changes, such as grammaticalisation, have implications across this range. Investigator: Dr. Anthony Diller (Faculty of Asian Studies, (ANU)

Historical-Comparative Styudy of Tai, Kam-Sui, and related languages of China—based on field work elicitations on location, Jerry Edmondson has been documenting the sound/lexical and to some extent grammatical change within this language family, and language contact phenomena. Investigator: Professor Jerold Edmondson, (Linguistics, University of Texas, Arlington)

Historical Linguistic Theory

Contact-induced change—This field is one which has seen an efflorescence in the last decade and encompasses the effects on a language of contact between its speakers and speakers of another language. Most often the vehicle of change is speakers' bilingualism. The aims of this project are to understand the processes of language change well enough to (i) be able to recognise them in the data we collect and thereby detect historic associations between speaker groups, and (ii) to make a significant contribution to cognitive aspects of linguistic theory. Various Investigators: Dr. Malcolm Ross (RSPAS, ANU), Dr. John Bowden (RSPAS, ANU), Dr. Harold Koch (School of Languages, ANU), Dr. Patrick McConvell (School of Languages, ANU), Dr. Paul Sidwell (RSPAS, ANU), Dr. Jennifer Hendriks (School of Languages, ANU), Dr. Kevin Windle (School of Languages, ANU), Professor Jerold Edmondson, (Linguistics, University of Texas, Arlington) [back to top]

Processes of syntactic change—focussing on (i) English historical syntax and (ii) the genesis of Serial Verb constructions from paratactic constructions and perhaps other sources. The field of historical syntax is another one that has seen a great increase in activity in recent years. The study of English historical syntax has a long tradition while the study of the genesis of serial verb constructions is a very new area. Both areas are benefiting currently from advances in syntactic theory. Investigators: Dr. Avery Andrews (School of Languages, ANU), Dr. Cynthia Allen (School of Languages, ANU)

Theory of language change—the roles of language change in (i) improving our ability to reconstruct linguistic prehistory and to interpret the relationship of that linguistic prehistory to archaeological and ethnographic findings and (ii) contributing to a better understanding of the architecture of language as a cognitive system. Various Investigators: Dr. Cynthia Allen (School of Languages, ANU), Professor Andrew Pawley (RSPAS, ANU), Dr. Malcolm Ross (RSPAS, ANU), Professor Matthew Spriggs (Archaeology and Anthropology, ANU), Dr. Peter Bellwood (Archaeology and Anthropology, ANU), Dr. Avery Andrews (School of Languages, ANU), Dr. Harold Koch (School of Languages, ANU), Dr. John Bowden (RSPAS, ANU).

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This document last modified: 6th March 2002
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